Do Women Still Wear Hosiery?

20191124011642_IMG_2440As you may have noticed from my posts, I am frequently wearing hosiery either in the form of pantyhose or tights. Personally, even if hosiery were no longer in style, I strive to be my own woman and to not be a slave of what’s currently trending. I wear what I think is attractive, comfortable and stylish regardless of what’s in vogue. However, with that said, I decided to do some research on this subject.
According to Dina Scherer of Modnitsa Styling, she states the following: “Stockings never truly go out of style, they are a classic staple in any elegant woman’s wardrobe; many workplaces require you to cover your legs for proprietary reasons, and nude stockings do the trick nicely. I think every year we see new players on the market, reinventing this essential wardrobe accessory.” (viennemilano stockings-still-in-style)
20190804_163653 (1)Here is an example of nude stockings. This is a picture from this post earlier this summer.
20191120_081146I am wearing gray ribbed tights that have 13% spandex and 87% nylon–they are so comfortable, warm and are librarian approved. Not sure about the red pumps though (ha!).
According to Hipstik (do-women-still-wear-pantyhose), “when it comes to pantyhose, it’s your choice to wear or not to wear. No rules.” Hipstik is a line of pantyhose designed to fit women of all shapes without rolling or squeezing and have a unique silicone stik strip that enables them to stay put all day. 
flapper stockings

Image Source: vintagedancer.com

I previously did a post here on flapper women and how they defied society’s expectations which is clearly evident in the photo above which was considered risqué for that time period. According to this article on the history of hosiery (viennemilano/pantyhose and tights), Dupont invented nylon in 1939 which “revolutionized the world of fashion and hosiery. Nylon stockings were all the craze and became an essential for every woman’s wardrobe.”
However, World War II increased the demand for nylon resulting in women having to “ration and donate their hosiery for the war effort, as the material was used to create tools such as parachutes, airplane chords, and tents. When the product was taken off the market completely, women had to come up with creative alternatives. Women began to paint seams on the back of their legs or use self-tanners and ‘liquid stockings’ to create the illusion that they were wearing hosiery.”

Image source Atomic Red Head

This idea of painting a line down the backs of my legs gives me an idea for next summer on hot, humid days…
20191124_141213
I am wearing ultra sheer “black mist” pantyhose by L’eggs. They are run resistant and contain 33% spandex and 67% nylon.
20190324_115716My favorite pantyhose color is off white or ivory which looks clean and crisp.
20190714035150_IMG_1675
20190302_202806Fishnet stocking provide a bold, chic and feminine look.
Do you wear hosiery? If so, what is your favorite kind? Mabel says she likes all of them. She actually chewed up a pair of mine recently but I eventually forgave her. I cannot expect my pantyhose to be both run resistant and dog proof, too!

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2 Comments on “Do Women Still Wear Hosiery?

  1. Since retirement I have worn neither skirts nor pantyhose, and that suits me just fine. I do remember the time when pantyhose was such wonderful freedom from garter belts and all such apparatus. You, Celeste, look marvelous in your skirts and hose. Your red bandana print dress is especially lovely on you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Carol, for your feedback and comments. Yes, pantyhose is an improvement over garter belts but the best freedom is probably not wearing them. It’s still hard to find run resistant ones, too.

      Like

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